Saddle Chairs

Ergonomic Office Stools

Ergonomic stools are Increasing in popularity, a great modern alternative to the standard office chair is an ergonomic stool. Stools improve posture by angling the hips and pelvis into a higher position than an average chair. This encourages the spine into its natural position and improves back pain by supporting the upper body in a way which does not place unnecessary strain on the back muscles. By perching instead of sitting, more movement is encouraged, therefore boosting productivity, well-being and cardiovascular activity. Ergonomic office stools also encourage dynamic sitting which increases core stability and strength. Our range of stools come with a variety of customisable features so that the user can decide exactly which functions they require for the most comfortable seating experience, making them a perfect choice for a modern working environment.

Are Saddle Chairs Good For You? 

The spinal column is not completely straight. It curves from front to back. It does not normally curve side to side. The way it curves from front to back is fixed. In the neck and in the lower back the spine curves inwards or into the body. Medically the inward curve is called lordosis. Hence there is a lordosis in the neck and in the lower back. The curve in the neck is called the cervical lordosis and the curve in the lower back is called the lumbar lordosis. However, behind the chest wall and in the pelvis the spine curves outwards or to outside the body.  The curve to the outside is medically called kyphosis. Hence the curve behind the chest wall is called the thoracic kyphosis.  To maintain the lower back in lordosis is very crucial. If the inward curve is not maintained, then the discs are not kept in a functional position. This can lead to back pain. This curve is so important that surgeons who operate on the spine take a lot of care in maintaining this curvature when the spine is fused.

Saddle Chairs Can Help Backpain And Posture

In normal life, the lumbar lordosis is affected by the position of the hip. When one is standing the muscles in the front is stretched and it pulls the lumbar spine forward to slightly increase the lumbar lordosis. When sitting the muscles in the back of the hip and the pelvis are stretched and they pull the spine backwards and the lordosis is obliterated. The inward curve (lordosis) of the lumbar spine is lost when seated at 90 degrees. 

To find out more - read the full article about saddle chairs.  

 

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